Dead Names, Dead Dog: Shooting the Messenger, Part 2

We return to the question of whether Crowley’s “Aiwass” was depicted as a blind, idiot chaos.  By all accounts, Crowley was the guy who met this supposed supernatural messenger, so his opinion really counts more than everyone else’s, right?

As it turns out, Crowley’s views, as expressed in his Confessions, are quite the opposite of those “Simon” attributes to this being:

The immense superiority of this particular intelligence, AIWASS, to any other with which mankind has yet been in conscious communication is shown not merely by the character of the Book itself, but by the fact of his comprehending perfectly the nature of the proof necessary to demonstrate the fact of his own existence and the conditions of that existence. And, further, having the proof required.

This critique goes even deeper. Crowley himself had been involved in a battle with his former mentor, MacGregor Mathers.  This experience had transformed his understanding of the force of Mars, that to which “Aiwass” is assigned:

The troubles of Mathers were due to his excessive devotion to Mars, who represents one side of the personality of Horus, and no doubt I was inclined to err in the opposite direction, to neglect and dislike Mars as the personification of unintelligent violence.

This reluctance, Crowley states, was what led him to be so reluctant to accept the Book of the Law‘s revelation. In effect, Crowley denies “Simon’s” depiction of Aiwass as a mindless agent of violence.  Once again, “Simon” has missed the mark.

Published in: on August 2, 2006 at 7:55 pm  Comments (2)  

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Don’t worry Harms! You will be a GateWalker someday 🙂

    http://warlockasylum.wordpress.com/2009/08/06/keys-to-the-ancinet-ones-part-11-the-meaning-of-azag-thoth/

    Be Well Brother

  2. Lovecraft left most of his supernatural beings intentionally ambiguous, to spite the learned.


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