Dead Names, Dead Dog: Dangerous Words?, Part 3

A couple posts ago, we were talking about “Simon’s” infamous blood sacrifice ritual from the Magan Text. Here’s how “Simon” explains it in Dead Names:

He further cites a line out of context from the Necronomicon’s Magan Text in which it is stated that in order to summon the Queen of Ghouls it is necessary to spill blood upon a stone and to strike that stone with a sword that has slain eleven men. What Gonce does not mention is that the Magan Text is prefaced by the narrator with the words:

The verses here following come from the secret text of some of the priests of a cult which is all that is left of the Old Faith that existed before Babylon was built, and it was originally in their tongue. . . And the horrors and ugliness that the Priest will encounter in his Rites are herein described, and their reasons, and their natures, and Essences.

This is not, as Gonce claims, a book that “speaks approvingly of sacrifice—possibly even human sacrifice and/or suicide.”

It certainly seems that way – or does it? Let’s take a look at some of the other parts of the Necronomicon.

For example, on page 212 there’s another ritual that you should definitely not do. It involves not creating a wax figurine which you should not put in a cauldron over a fire. Even if somehow you do manage that, you should certainly not chant the eight-line stanza given in the text, because, that would be wrong.

Likewise, let’s look at the Urilia Text. Here we find the seals of the Azonei, evil beings who oppose the present gods and whose invocation will bring about hell on earth. Then again, if you do get the urge to summon them for some reason, the text gives you instructions on how to open the gate to them, at a particular time, using a particular incantation and particular ritual implements. Even then, you are strongly advised that, after the Hour of Tiamat, one should certainly not be keeping that gate open!

It’s certainly odd that “Simon” claims to know that what the mad Arab really meant here. It’s like he knew the guy…

I should state that we’re not alone in these speculations on the Necronomicon. In fact, we are backed up in these assertions by “Simon” himself made in his tapes in 1981:

Usually, when someone warns you against something specifically, it’s almost an invitation to do it. The authors of these books [grimoires] will always give you rituals that you must never perform concerning things you must never even think about and you’re given those rituals in the uttermost detail, and it’s a kind of double-bind system where damned if you do and damned if you don’t. At a certain level of one’s initiation, of one’s personal initiation, one will reach the point where it might be possible to actually get involved with those forces and be harmless from any ill effects. For anyone starting the system, it’s a no-no.

When I asked him about this on the Ian Punnett show, “Simon” stated that he couldn’t remember what he said in 1981. I think that’s pretty convenient.

Next… is the Necronomicon dangerous? What “Simon” says…

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Published in: on August 19, 2006 at 10:38 pm  Comments (1)  

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  1. Dear Mr. Harms, let me apologize up front for my obvious weakness, as the urge to set some things right here is overwhelming… I know that this post is from a long time ago, and my reaction is by no means an attack on you personally, but you already know that. 😉

    Let us start with the “Sword that hath slain eleven Men”. This is a metaphor, which means that before awakening the power of TIAMAT one has to have passed eleven Gates (We know there are more Gates than just the Seven initiatory Gates).

    In regards to the wax doll and the Charm on page 212 I can tell you that I use those practices regularly, being an Initiate of the Fire Cult, of Maqlu, and at times with devastating effect. The Uninitiated can do no harm with the charm, for i have proven it to be written incorrectly, rendering the spell impotent, due to the importance of a proper pronunciation in order for a proper working.

    I could go on, but I only wanted to illustrate how much the knowledge about the Necronomicon has increased among the practitioners.

    Stay blessed, my friend!!


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