Precious Apothecary Release, Shipping, Brexit, Golden Hoard, and Witch Bottles

Gardback’s Trolldom, Great Pendragon Campaign, Sibly Clavis, Dungeon Crawl Classics, Cecil Williamson’s Book of Witchcraft

The temperature outside is freezing in upstate, so I hope you’re warmer where you are.

Avalonia, with whom I’ve published in the past, has released the latest book by Cyprianic specialist José Leitão, Precious Apothecary. A quick note:

Precious Apothecary is a translation of Botica Preciosa, a Catholic Grimoire compiled by Ângelo de Sequeira Ribeiro do Prado (1707-1776) who was perhaps the most important Brazilian missionary in history. The Botica Preciosa (1754) was his first book and is a collection of prayers, devotions and exercises to the Lady of the Rock and 120 other Saints. Suffused with the author’s missionary purpose the book also contains the consecrations and blessings for oils, flowers, statues and food, as well as exorcisms and prayers for many ailments intended for situations where no priests were available.

A few notes for collectors and book lovers: The ongoing COVID-19 crisis has led to some difficulties that you should be aware of. International shipping rates have gone up substantially in many cases, making it problematic to make small-scale orders – such as used books – without paying major markups. Most specifically for grimoire collectors, Stephen Skinner announced that Golden Hoard books – including the upcoming Volume 2 of the Ars Notoria – cannot be shipped from them directly and will need to be ordered from Llewellyn and Amazon instead. I hope this situation is only temporary for them.

And then, there’s Brexit. (Yay, more politics!) As part of the New Year’s Brexit decision-making, the UK government decided to require overseas businesses shipping to UK customers to collect Value Added Tax up front, requiring a business to create an account with their government to do so. (Full disclosure: apparently the EU is going to do the same thing in a year and a half, but they’re planning to exempt orders under a certain amount.) Thus, unless a small press or bookseller does a great deal of UK business, they will likely choose simply not to ship to customers there instead of navigating the logistical headaches of it.

(Note: Friend of the blog Steve points out that most printed materials are exempted from VAT, so we shouldn’t have a problem here for most book sales. I would still question how this might affect other products that might be offered alongside these. My message below still stands.)

My overall message: this is a time when both customers and booksellers should keep an eye on shipping rates and regulations, and – gasp! – advocate to their government for what works best for them. Unlike other goods, it is often hard to simply replace one book with another, so such restrictions can have long-term negative impacts on scholarship and the exchange of ideas.

I’m setting aside the Book of Four Wizards for a week or so to revise the witch bottle book released in Caduceus’ Bellhouse set. I’ve had people ask me about it, so I think it might be time to see if I can’t prep it for a wider audience. We’ll see how it goes.

Published in: on January 31, 2021 at 3:52 pm  Comments (3)  

The Book of Four Wizards, Illustrating Magic, Magical Manuscripts Online, An British Library Exhibition, Curators of the Occult Speak, Personal Update

My best wishes to all the students, faculty, and university workers who are trying to make the best of all sorts of difficult situations.

I am halfway through the modernization and footnotes on the Book of Four Wizards. The material I’ve found ranges from a ritual right out of the Hygromanteia to a satirical work aimed at discrediting Catholic priests.

Also, if any readers are proficient with the sort of illustration of magical seals and diagrams that appear within my last two works and want to work on something of the sort, please get in touch.

Editions du Monolithe posted a link to a manuscript with magical material, Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg, Cod. Pal. germ. 212. Also, here’s an Italian Clavicula at the University of Pennsylvania. You might also check out Frater Acher’s site, where he’s put up translations of some manuscripts from the Leipzig magical archive.

If you happen to be in a country where taking basic precautions against communicable disease isn’t a political argument that leads to everyone visiting the UK undergoing two weeks of quarantine, you might take in the British Library’s exhibition of Hebrew books, including a manual of magic.

Brian Johnson posted a link to this talk at the Brooklyn Book Fair by several curators of library collections that involve magic or the occult, which I have yet to watch.

My next review will be Newcomb’s A Modern User’s Guide to the Black Pullet, although that might wait until next month to be finished.

Published in: on September 11, 2020 at 10:26 pm  Comments (1)  

Treadwell’s, Magic Journal for Free, Manuscript Update, Magical Notes and Queries, The Internet Archive, Nonsense Words, and the Modena Inquisition

I’m working with Treadwell’s again to put on a series of lectures on various topics. One – a talk on fairy magic – is up in their lecture series, and I’m thinking about some others.

The journal Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft has put its contents out for free online until the end of the month – so, very soon. If you miss that, or you like what you see, membership in the Societas Magica is pretty cheap.

I’m finding my way along through a lengthy Latin section of love spells in The Book of Four Wizards. A good number of them come from the Picatrix, yet there are some others – one with valerian, one with rosemary flowers, and a final one with the fleshy part of a foal’s head – that I have yet to source.

I’m wondering if a good resource for researchers in the history of magic wouldn’t be a magical version of the journal Notes and Queries, suitable for brief inquiries into problems that might emerge during research. If anyone has any great ideas for how to accomplish that, please let me know.

The latest big news in intellectual property was that the Internet Archive shut down unlimited access to its National Emergency Library due to a publisher lawsuit. There are concerns now that this means the Internet Archive itself will cease to exist, which is a major problem due to the extensiveness and usefulness of its public domain scanning program. People are up in arms at the publishers, and at author Chuck Wendig in particular, for suing and speaking out.

To explain my position, let me use an analogy:

You have evidence that the local casino is crooked and exploitative. You have extensive talks with your family about it. Then one day, a family member walks into the casino, puts the family’s retirement and college savings on red, and loses it all. When everyone finds out about what happened, they get mad at the casino.

The Internet Archive’s collection really is a wonderful resource, but getting mad at publishers is always easy – and getting mad at particular authors is too much like punching down for my tastes. If we want the world that the Internet Archive promised, you need to starting building it with systematic change of the copyright system.

Rant off.

A couple of other works I’ve dipped into deserve a brief mention here. Ciaran Arthur’s ‘Charms’, Liturgies, and Secret Rites in Early Medieval England proposes that it’s difficult to separate charms from liturgical material in monastic texts of the time. Further, he proposes that a great deal of what we think of as voces magicae, or nonsense words of power in incantations, may be multilinguistic monastic wordplay, at least in the particular setting he’s studying. It’s certainly a hypothesis that should be examined in connection with texts from other eras – I’m not sure how useful it is for early modern magic, when English monasticism came to an end and we end up with texts that are explicitly magical, but it’s worth looking into.

I also enjoyed part of Matteo Duni’s Under the Devil’s Spell, a work on the Inquisition’s exploration of magical practices in Modena during the Renaissance. That’s not to dismiss the rest – I just went straight for his translations of the depositions, for some interesting material on magical practices from the period. Both books are worth looking into at your local library, whenever those open in your area again.

Be safe and well, everyone.

Published in: on June 26, 2020 at 6:52 pm  Comments (2)  

Three out of Four Ain’t Bad: The Book of Four Wizards Update

Still working on that review – but I have a small project update.

I went to NYC for a few days to engage in some intensive research and book work while apartment-sitting for a friend. I managed to finish up the double-check of the text, and I’ve started modernizing the writing. Last time, this took a month – I think it’ll take longer this time, given that the writing is more challenging and I’m working with more images.

I also got to do some research at the reading room of the NYPL. Special thanks to the kind people at the Pforzheimer Collection, who let in a stranger who arrived unannounced to view an Olivia Serres letter. I’m fairly confident now that she’s the fourth hand in the manuscript – and her contributions, once we set aside the early nineteenth-century poetry, do establish her as yet another individual interested in the practice of magic and alchemy.

In the meantime, I might have found another author. The manuscript features a few different divinatory items using numerology based on adding up values of the name of the querent. In one such place, an abbreviated name appears – and the best match for the numerological values seems to be “Thomas Harrington.” I initially thought this might be the work of the original 17th century author, but closer examination of the handwriting makes it more likely this is the late 18th century annotator.

I wasn’t hopeful about finding too much about Mr. Harrington, given how common his name was – until I ran a search in WorldCat. (This is generally a good practice for backgrounding anyone.) There I found a listing for A catalogue of the very rare and curious library of Dr. Thos. Harrington, decd. : comprising old songs, ballads, history, magic, witchcraft …, to be sold at auction by Thomas King Jr. at Covent Garden on May 20, 1806. Other publications of music from the late 18th century indicate that Harrington might have been local to Bury St. Edmunds.

Thanks to the help of Bobby Derie and Dave Goudsward, I’ve now seen a newspaper advertisement of the sale, which lists that the person is a “well-known collector” of, among other things, “magic, witchcraft, [and] astrology,” and who owned “curious manuscripts” on many topics. It’s not 100%, but I feel pretty good about pursuing this particular lead.

As to the 17th century original author – who knows?

Published in: on November 5, 2019 at 3:17 pm  Leave a Comment  

My English Excursion, Part 5

After my previous adventures (Parts 1, 2, 3, and 4), it was refreshing to spend some time on my own looking at manuscripts.

On some days, I walked over to the British Library early to get into the queue that, by 9:30, stretches across the plaza. I’d head up to the manuscripts room, sit down with my four manuscripts for the day, and work my way through the relevant sections. After I hit the four, I’d be cut off as if I was at a bar, and I’d wander down the road to the Wellcome Institute to peruse their collection.

People aren’t permitted to take pictures in the Reading Room, and if you want to see a reproduction of a manuscript page, you have to fill out this form. I did find a quintessentially British sign in the commissary:

Hot Water Sign

I’ll cut the difference and publish this photo of the cover of Sloane MS. 3826, to give you a taste of what the experience is like:

Sloane 3826 Cover

On other days, I hopped on a train or bus to Oxford, where I visited the Bodleian Library to see their collection. These were long days, but I did get occasional opportunities to see a street fair, or to visit Worcester College, former site of Gloucester Hall, to find the home of Thomas Allen (who I’ve mentioned earlier), with no success.

Worcester College

It’s hard to talk about a typical day, though, because there were so many atypical ones. For example, one day I went to the Society of Antiquaries of London, which you can see here:

IMG_6337

There was also the day I was trying to get cream tea, to try to redeem my ridiculous cream-team related failure in Cornwall that will never been known, and I ended up getting high tea at King’s Cross instead:

High Tea at King's Cross

Apparently some people have wine with high tea. So, wine with tea. No, I don’t get it.

There was the night at Treadwell’s in which I gave everyone a preview of my upcoming Folklore article, with some additional commentary. It was wonderful, as are all my trips to Cornwall.

Yet… there was one trip left to take…

Published in: on August 17, 2018 at 6:41 pm  Comments (1)  

My English Excursion, Part 2

We left off in our travelogue with a member of our party vanishing on Bodmin Moor. The rest of us decided to go back to the car and eat pasties, until I ventured forth again – only to be called back by C—–, who had ventured back to the road and thence to our car park.

With the group once again complete, we departed to fulfill my mother’s request to see a stately manor house. Thus, we braved the rain to walk to the manor of Lanhydrock. My mother wished to visit the home of a prominent family, and I had come to see the place for which the infamous John Tregeagle – described at different points as a man, a ghost, a giant, and a big bird – was known.

(What – you think I actually took pictures of the house itself? Do you take me for someone who takes consistent vacation photos? Fine – here’s a shot of the kitchen.)

Lanhydrock Kitchen

Sadly, Tregeagle had left no trace in the manor. To find out anything, I knocked on the door of the archive, and the nice people therein were willing to give me a potted background of the man.

John Tregagle Biography

We were moving rapidly through the building, until we were delayed by a glorious library, one of the county’s largest theological collections of the time. The books could not be taken off the shelf and the organization was uncertain, but a quick scan did turn up Wierus’ De praestigiis daemonum and a few minor works by Agrippa. There was also a work devoted to remedies written by a past owner, but I was unable to access it.

A former owner's notebook and Wierus

Agrippa Works at Lanhydrock

Satisfied and thoroughly damp, we made our way back to Penzance.

Next time – magic in Boscastle, and another curious disappearance!

Published in: on July 3, 2018 at 7:31 pm  Comments (2)  

Necronomicon Files Banned in Texas Prisons

The Dallas Morning News just published a story on a lengthy list of permitted and banned books maintained by penal system in Texas. It features a searchable index of all the books that inmates are not allowed to own.

Being curious as to whether our friend Simon’s books are on it, I ran a quick search – only to find that The Necronomicon Files is on the list!  I’m guessing this is because of one particular piece of art in the book that includes nudity.  As it happens, so is my edition of The Long-Lost Friend

As for Simon? Texas really likes his works. You can check the downloadable list of permitted books in the spreadsheet just above the search box. The Necronomicon Spellbook is listed twice, and, depending upon how you interpret some of the vague entries, Simon’s Necronomicon has been approved between three and five different times.  Even though I don’t particularly care for Simon and his works, I think that he has a perfect right to have them appear.

Other approved works include those of friends of the blog Joshua Free and Kenneth Hite, as are the Call of Cthulhu and Delta Green RPGs. Oh, yes, and the Cthulhu Mythos Encyclopedia is free to own.

The list possesses some strange elements. First, some purely academic works on magic, such as Ankarloo and Clark’s Witchcraft and Magic in Europe series, and Seligmann’s Magic, Supernaturalism and Religion, aren’t on the list. Second, there are plenty of works on magic on the approved list – run a search for “magic” or “charm” in that spreadsheet – that are probably similar in content to the Friend.

Oh yes – and Neo-Nazi and white supremacist works are perfectly fine.

The takeaway? Censorship is wrong, and its implementation leads people to make bizarre decisions, especially when it comes to works on the occult.

 

Published in: on December 8, 2017 at 5:27 pm  Comments (2)  

Update on the Newberry Book of Magical Charms

Do you recall the news that the Newberry Library in Chicago was transcribing a seventeenth-century British book of spells? I certainly do, because everyone in the world told me about it.

The Chicago Tribune brings us an update, with the usual fake scares and cheesiness, emphasizing just how successful this project was. The entire work has now been transcribed and translated, with a JSON file version available of the entire text.

We can hope that other libraries with similar books might see the success and good publicity from this project and provide us with similar opportunities very soon.

Published in: on November 3, 2017 at 10:00 am  Leave a Comment  

Review – Bellingrandt and Otto’s Magical Manuscripts in Early Modern Europe

In 1710, a huge collection of magical, cabalistic, and alchemical manuscripts, part of the collection of medical professional Samuel Schröer, came up for sale. In that climate of official censorship, pulling off such an exchange would seem remarkable – but the agent put out a small catalog, most likely circulated face to face, and a buyer was located for the bulk of the books.

This large collection, mostly intact, now rests at the Leipzig University Library – if you’d like to see it yourself, Mihai Vartejaru has provided a list of the digitized copies with convenient links. What the new book Magical Manuscripts in Early Modern Europe, by Daniel Bellingradt and Bernd-Christian Otto, provides is not the text of these works, but a history and description of the collection.  The work is released as part of the Palgrave Pivot series, dedicated to releasing shorter pieces of scholarship than what might usually appear in book format.

The main portion of the book provides a brief discussion of manuscripts of ritual magic, the details of the collection’s sale, and its significance within the book trade, the intellectual climate, and the legal system of the time.  All of this is interesting – save for the background on magical books which is available through other sources – but it is also very brief.  By my count, it covers about thirty-five pages, not including references – the length of a long-form journal article.  I hesitate to mention this, but given the book’s price, I think it deserves to be mentioned.

The real meat of the book, however, is in the first appendix: a detailed list of the 140 books in the collection, most of which still survive and are available. For each one in which the information is known, we are told the title(s), ascribed authors, size and pagination, languages, and contents.  The latter are quite diverse.  We have treatises on astronomy, Kabbala, and numerology, along with a few different versions of the Key of Solomon. We also have manuscripts attributed to Abramelin and Faust that are printed elsewhere, and a wide variety of works dedicated to all manner of talismans, consecrations, and other procedures.  Collections have been dedicated to love, hate, military matters, treasure hunting, invisibility, and other purposes.  A number of brief operations of note are also present. Two will conjure the infamous Baron, while another calls for bringing a pizza to the crossroads. No doubt everyone in the occult hipster community will be talking about the magical crossroads pizza in a few years…

Anyway, the authors give us seventy pages of this material, which will be the major draw of the book for most of you. The work is rounded out with a reprint of the original 1710 catalog and a brief index.

What would have really driven this book over the top would have been a discussion beyond the context of the collection, diving into its contents. What do the contents tell us about its owners? What were their areas of particular interest? Were they practitioners or collections? (At least one owner seems to have been using these works, a notice buried in the endnotes tells us.) Is it missing any notable period works? Given the sheer amount of material, any analysis would have to be lengthy and detailed, but with the length of the main text, I think there could certainly have been room.

In brief, the discussion of the collection’s milieu is interesting but brief, the modern catalog of the manuscripts is amazing and thought-provoking, and all of this deals with a collection of manuscripts of which we will be hearing a great deal in the future. No, I don’t know of anyone else working on them, but there definitely will be soon.  I should note that it contains no actual transcripts of particular rites, lest anyone seek them out.  Nonetheless, the book is a preview of the next stage in grimoire scholarship and publishing, and you should definitely get it if that interests you.

UPDATE, 11/11: That lengthy appendix detailing the contents of all the books has been posted on Academia.edu.

Published in: on October 8, 2017 at 12:24 pm  Comments (1)  

The Price of Occult Books, Part 6 – Possible Solutions

So, having gone through the roles of publishing (1 and 2), libraries, collecting , and authors, when it comes to the price of occult books.  What are the solutions, then?

Let’s begin with the proposition that the availability of the content of occult books is something that is a common good.  This should be balanced against the desire of creators and publishers to make money off of their work, and to create beautiful and artistic objects as they see fit.  This is mitigated by the fact that, once a limited edition book goes out of print, neither authors nor publishers are likely to see meaningful returns upon them.

So, what can be done?  I’m going to suggest some options.  Perhaps some of them have been tried before, and others may only work in particular situations, but I think all of them deserve some thought. I’d like to give examples of publishers and authors who are already using some of these strategies.

  • Making less expensive editions available:  The premier publisher for this right now is Scarlet Imprint, which publishes its works in both premium editions and its Bibliothèque Rouge imprint of paperbacks.  We also have some items in the Penn State Magic in History series, which have cheap e-books available of their higher price print books. (If you’ve bought books from their series through Amazon, check the prices there; I bought the print edition of Forbidden Rites from them nineteen years ago, and I was able to pick up the e-book a few weeks ago for $2.) The releases could be simultaneous, or the cheaper edition might appear some months or years down the line.
  • Make the text freely available. I might include here how we published a transcription of Folger V.b.26 online.   Here’s another example. Owen Davies just co-authored a book, Executing Magic in the Modern Era, which deals with all manner of folklore and beliefs about the power of executioners and the trappings of executions.  It’s a bit pricey for the content, I have to admit – save that it’s a Creative Comments document.  Clicking on that link above will get you an authorized PDF.
  • Working with libraries:  Both the United States and the UK have depository programs, in which every copy of a book published in the country is to be sent to a library.  This is rarely enforced, but it provides an incentive for a publisher to make a copy available to someone able to travel there.

It might also be possible to make a donation of a book to an appropriate library.  I would suggest finding a library with appropriate collections and speaking with an appropriate person on the staff, so the library doesn’t accidentally put the work in the local book sale.

I acknowledge that any of these will nonetheless leave certain barriers in place, as the ability to travel, access the Internet, or obtain credit cards or other means of online purchase may limit those able to access them.  Nonetheless, it might be a good start.

Are these plausible?  Could we try other methods?  I’d be interested to hearing what you have to say.

 

 

 

Published in: on September 20, 2017 at 6:31 pm  Comments (2)